Advocacy Tools: Implementing the English Learner Roadmap and Affirming the Rights of English Learners

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California’s diverse population speaks dozens of different languages. That diversity contributes to the best parts of our state – a vibrant culture, innovative spirit, and strong economy.

The same is true in California’s schools, where one in five public school students is learning English on top of the language(s) they speak at home. Everyone involved in our schools has a responsibility to make sure English Learners have access to the opportunities and supports they need to thrive in school. Fortunately, California’s English Learner Roadmap provides a clear path for this to happen, and a series of federal and state laws outline the basic rights of English learner students and their families in school. 

The Education Trust–West has created three resources to help families and other community members learn about California’s vision for educating English learners, start conversations with their schools, and understand English learners’ rights:

 

What is California’s English Learner Roadmap?

The English Learner Roadmap lays out a vision for what districts and schools need to do to support English Learner students and their families.

A new resource from ETW, What is California’s English Learner Roadmap?, breaks down the basics of the Roadmap and the role that everyone involved in California’s schools and districts should play in bringing it to life.

Download in English

Download in Spanish

10 Questions to Ask Your School and District about California’s English Learner Roadmap

The English Learner Roadmap’s vision relies on everyone involved in California’s schools to take action. Find out what your district is doing to support English Learner students now with our guide, 10 Questions to Ask Your School and District about California’s English Learner Roadmap!

Download in English

Download in Spanish

 

English Learners Have Rights!: An Advocacy Guide for Parents and Other Stakeholders

English learner students and their families have unique rights, from receiving language support services to helping make school and district decisions. English Learners Have Rights!: An Advocacy Guide for Parents and Other Stakeholders, another new resource from ETW, explains the rights that advocates – including parents, administrators, and educators – should know about.

Download in English

Download in Spanish

Related Resources

Unlocking Learning I: Science as a Lever for English Learner Equity

Unlocking Learning II: Math as a Lever for English Learner Equity

The Language of Reform: English Learners in California’s Shifting Education Landscape

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Karla Fernandez

Communications Manager

Karla Fernandez (she/her/hers) joins Ed Trust–West as a Communications Manager with over 11 years of experience advancing social impact initiatives.

Karla started her career as a teacher at Chicago Public Schools and UIC College Prep. After teaching, Karla joined United Friends of the Children to support LA County’s youth in foster care as a college counselor. Through Leadership for Educational Equity, Karla also served as a Policy Advisor Fellow for the office of a Los Angeles Unified School Board Member. She solidified her interests in policy analysis and quantitative research during her time with the Price Center for Social Innovation, the Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles, and the USC Presidential Working Group on Sustainability. Before joining The Education Trust–West, Karla was the Associate Director for the Southeast Los Angeles (SELA) Collaborative, a network of nonprofits advocating for communities in SELA.

Karla holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Anthropology from the University of Chicago, a Master of Public Policy from the USC Price School of Public Policy, and a Graduate Certificate in Policy Advocacy from the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. Karla is based out of southern California and is passionate about using data analysis, communications, and digital strategies for policy advocacy and social justice efforts.