Press Release

Statewide and Grassroots Organizations Across California Launch FairShare4Kids Campaign to Make Sure Funding Benefits High-Need Students in their Schools and Classrooms

Publication date: Nov 5, 2013

OAKLAND, CA (November 5, 2013) – Days before the California State Board of Education begins its review of proposed regulations for how school districts can use billions of dollars in funding for low-income students, English Language Learners and foster youth, organizations from across California are launching the FairShare4Kids Campaign (FairShare4Kids.org). Coalition members including Alliance for a Better Community, Alliance San Diego, Californians for Justice, Community Coalition, Congregations Organized for Prophetic Engagement, The Education Trust—West, Families in Schools, Great Oakland Public Schools Leadership Center, National Center for Youth Law, Reading and Beyond, Students for Education Reform, and United Way Los Angeles are committed to working together to make sure that Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) lives up to its promise and provides additional resources to low-income students, English Learners and foster youth.

“We were proud to support Governor Brown when he signed LCFF because we believed in its promise for our neediest students and most underserved communities,” said Angelica Solis, Executive Director of Alliance for A Better Community (ABC) in Los Angeles. “Unless the State Board of Education passes strong rules, we know that funding for low-income students, English Learners and foster youth benefits may never benefit them in their schools and classrooms.”

Local Control Funding Formula provides every school district, charter schools and county office of education with additional dollars and supplemental funding for low-income students, English Language Learners, and foster youth. Under the law, the State Board of Education (SBE) is responsible for creating the regulations that will determine how districts can use these funds to provide additional services for underserved students.

“For LCFF to work, the State Board must ensure that districts spend the additional supplementary and concentration funding to increase critical services for low-income students, English Language Learners and foster youth in their schools,” said Luis Santana, Executive Director of Reading and Beyond, located in Fresno, CA. “The Board has the power to make sure that districts engage parents as real partners in making important decisions on how these dollars are used at the local level.”

On Thursday, the State Board of Education will review draft regulations for the use of LCFF funding. Many of the organizations who are part of the FairShare4Kids campaign signed onto a coalition letter to the State Board of Education strongly criticizing the proposed regulations for allowing districts to use supplemental and concentration funding intended for high-need students for other purposes.

“When he called for the passage of LCFF, Governor Brown said ‘equal treatment for children in unequal situations is not justice’,” said Arun Ramanathan, Executive Director of The Education Trust—West, based in Oakland. “We call on the Governor, the State Board of Education and local school districts to make sure that that Local Control Funding Formula does not become another broken promise to our neediest students and communities. LCCF must provide students with the supports they need to achieve their college and career dreams,” he concluded.

To join the campaign, go to the FairShare4Kids.org website. You will also find:

  • LCFF Explainer Video;
  • District Funding Data Tool;
  • LCFF Community Brief;
  • LCFF One-Page Overview;
  • LCFF Community PowerPoint Presentation;
  • Advocacy Letter Campaign Tool.

 

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About FairShare4Kids Campaign (FairShare4Kids.org):

FairShare4Kids is a statewide campaign in support of equitable school funding in California. Supporters include: Alliance for a Better Community, Alliance San Diego, Californians for Justice, Community Coalition, Congregations Organized for Prophetic Engagement, The Education Trust—West, Families in Schools, Great Oakland Public Schools Leadership Center, National Center for Youth Law, Reading and Beyond, Students for Education Reform, and United Way Los Angeles

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